May 25, 2019, 12:00:31 pm



Paratya australiensis

Started by TheProfessoR, December 27, 2018, 03:58:38 am

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TheProfessoR

December 27, 2018, 03:58:38 am Last Edit: December 27, 2018, 07:05:07 am by TheProfessoR
Did You Know.

This variety of Paratya or Australian glass shrimp is likely to be the most under-rated shrimp in Australia, bar none.

Their common names of 'glass shrimp', 'ghost shrimp' and 'clear shrimp' do not do this group of dwarf shrimp justice and nor does the widespread use of these little creatures as live food.

This particular species complex (a group of closely related species currently described as being a single species) is much suited to life in your aquarium, being tough, great algae eaters, very widespread and extremely easy to collect, and yet their breeding will provide a serious challenge for even the most hardcore shrimp keepers.

Why are they awesome?

Simply because of their potential.

These shrimp offer an enormous opportunity for breeding new dedicated variations such as algae eaters for use in aquascapes, as hardy and tough shrimp for beginner keepers, as brackish water specialists for biotopes, and a whole lot more besides.

Paratya are found in a wide variety of colours (clear, orange, black, green, blue and even fully red individuals) and patterns (dorsal and tiger stripe patterns as well as speckled and blotched).

Not much is known whether their colouration is controllable by diet, stress or any other environmental factors, or if indeed line breeding may result in fixed colour variants, suggesting there is considerable potential for breeders to dedicate themselves towards fixing colours and patterns etc.

Taxonomy of Australian Paratya.

In Australia the genus Paratya has a most interesting taxonomic history.

First described by Kemp in 1917, it was in 1953 that Riek proposed a number of new species and sub-species of Paratya.

In 1979, Williams and Smith both reviewed the genus and made the declaration that all the Paratya from the eastern coast of Australia were indeed a single species, that being P. australiensis.

Recent phylogenetic analysis (comparing the DNA of individuals from differing locations) suggested that  P. australiensis is likely a group of very closely related species or a species complex (Baker et al., 2004; Cook et al., 2006; 2007; Hughes et al., 2003; Hurwood et al., 2003).

Presently, Australian taxonomists are attempting to unravel the Australian Paratya species complex for the first time and it seems likely the 'species' we now call P. australiensis will most likely be broken up into between 9 and 11 entirely new species.

Its hoped this work will also shed light on the relationships between Australian Paratya and those Paratya found elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific region.

The fact that Paratya from Australia have been determined to be a species complex has significant implications for hobbyists in terms of collecting, breeding, hybridization and collecting, and these issues bear further, close examination.

Where to find them?

Species from the genus Paratya are not just limited to Australia.

They can be found through-out the entire western Pacific region with a disjunct northern range encompassing the North Pacific region (Korea, Japan, Siberia, Ryukyu Islands, ) and the South Pacific (Australia, New Zealand, Lord Howe, Norfolk Island, New Caledonia).


In Australia, Paratya are to be found all along the east coast, from the Atherton Tablelands near Cairns in the north, right down to the east coast of Tasmania as well as being found further inland, throughout the Murray-Darling system.


In those areas, Paratya can be found in creeks, rivers as well as estuaries, but are also frequently seen in more static water such as dams.

Both adults and juveniles from south-eastern Australia are extremely tolerant of brackish water up to a salinity level of almost seawater or 33PPT, however both adults and juveniles very happily live and breed in freshwater hundreds of kilometres from any ocean.

This lends almost limitless scope for including Paratya in biotope aquariums, from brackish tanks containing sand, nerites and plants, on up to completely freshwater tanks containg leaf litter and rocks, but without plants.


Interestingly, Paratya are not to be found in the western half of Australia, and the 'glass shrimp' reported to be captured on the west coast around Perth are probably the entirely different shrimp, Palaemonetes australis, though its been reported that Caridina indistincta from eastern Australia has been introduced into several rivers surrounding Perth.

We would remind here, thats it is very important to never release any aquarium organism, including shrimp, into the wild.

JohnnyB

H'mmm,

Interesting, maybe I should get some?   ;D
It is what it is, until it isn't, then it's something else entirely!

tva351

December 29, 2018, 11:35:24 pm #2 Last Edit: December 30, 2018, 11:30:30 pm by tva351
I have some in my community planted tank in the lounge room that I breed my Bristlenose and Guppies in. I probably have 40-50 it's hard to tell because they are hard to see with the plants etc. They coexist with the cherry shrimp in there and all the fish. Amazing creatures that grow alot bigger than the Neo's.

SnappaGuy

Quote from: tva351 on December 29, 2018, 11:35:24 pm
I have some in my community planted tank in the lounge room that I breed my Bristlenose and Guppies in. I probably have 40-50 it's hard to tell because they are hard to see with the plants etc. They coexist with the cherry shrimp in there and all the fish. Amazing creatures that grow alot bigger than the Neo's.


Okey dokey, I have none presently but on the strength of your post will now aquire some.   :D

Do you think they would coexist with a male betta, he has quite an easy going temperament?
I won't accept just any kind of krap, only the highest quality krap will do!

tva351

I have a nano tank with a betta and cherry shrimps. He has left them alone right from the start. I don't have glass shrimp with him but I can't see why you couldn't keep them with a betta. Glass shrimp are bigger than cherries,and with enough plants and decorations to hide in I can't see why you couldn't. Just make sure ol' betta gets food and he's not bored in the tank.If he has a good temperament they should be fine.

CrazyElk

Quote from: tva351 on December 30, 2018, 08:27:34 pm
I have a nano tank with a betta and cherry shrimps. He has left them alone right from the start. I don't have glass shrimp with him but I can't see why you couldn't keep them with a betta. Glass shrimp are bigger than cherries,and with enough plants and decorations to hide in I can't see why you couldn't. Just make sure ol' betta gets food and he's not bored in the tank.If he has a good temperament they should be fine.


Ok, you have cherry shrimp and a betta with no problems huh, I tried that and while the betta did not seem to chase/annoy/attack the cherries, over a week or so the dozen I put in just umm disappeared, so I have to assume he was the culprit.

Admittedly they where smallish but I have not tried that since.
Arghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh !

tva351

At the rate red cherry shrimps breed, I was willing to give it a go as I had so many of them. At first my betta was interested in the shrimp but not as food more "What the hell are these things?" If he has had some, I really haven't noticed.

Girrig

I've got some blue ones from live fish a few months ago.. they are breeding but all have gone white inside

morgan16

Quote from: Girrig on January 05, 2019, 12:45:18 am
I've got some blue ones from live fish a few months ago.. they are breeding but all have gone white inside


Hello, so does that mean they are not blue anymore?  :o
Tank - AquaOne 380    Filter - Inbuilt 400lph    Heater - 55w    Substrate - AquaOne White Gravel    Plants - Live Pine Needles

Girrig

It's weird, I'm at work currently but they are blue on outside kinda sti

Girrig


SnappaGuy

Quote from: Girrig on January 07, 2019, 07:58:33 am
https://imgur.com/a/24VOyF7


Now that is interesting, perhaps you are developing a new variety?   ;D

Where did you aquire your original stock from?
I won't accept just any kind of krap, only the highest quality krap will do!

Girrig

Livefish.com.au, funny thing is they are definitely breeding fine. I was worried about it being muscle necrosis but no symptoms with my Sunkist neos in the same tank.

For reference here is a pic of when I first got them

https://www.reddit.com/r/shrimptank/comments/9kctte/my_new_paratya_australiensis_settling_into_there/?utm_source=reddit-android

tva351


Girrig

They have been this way for about two months and still breeding and eating just fine so I don't know what to do, no deaths yet either